Benefits of Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) in Corona

FDA- Approved Methodology

Opioid Replacement Therapy including Methadone and Buprenorphine are approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). The American Academy of Pediatrics, American Medical Association (AMA), Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) are actively advocating and recommending Medication Assisted Treatment as a safe, and appropriate effective evidence-based treatment for patients with significant opioid use dependence.

“Setting the Record Straight”

According to recent clinical outcome studies, methadone maintenance patients remaining compliant with medication treatment and behavioral therapy had a long-term success rate of 60 to 90% achieving long term abstinence from illicit drugs. Compared to “Abstinence-Based“ and Non-Medical substance abuse treatment patients, long term success was between 5 and 10%.

“Methadone and/or Buprenorphine (Suboxone) are just another addictive substance. You’re not Really Sober with Medication Assisted Treatment.”

Addiction is a chronic healthcare condition that requires medical treatment. Although Medication Assistance Treatment does not follow an “Abstinence Based” treatment model it does lower risks of ongoing substance abuse. Medication Assisted Treatment has proven safe and effective in reducing and/or eliminating the effects of withdrawal symptoms, reduced cravings. Enabling individuals in changing years of addictive behaviors into a healthier stable lifestyle for the individual and their family.

“Methadone and/or Buprenorphine (Suboxone) can lead to increased risk of overdose death if you relapse.”

Methadone and/or buprenorphine are opioids deemed safe and effective treatment under the supervision of a qualified physician. The medication acts as a protective barrier while maintaining patients’ tolerance to other opioids. This barrier greatly reduces the risk of overdose, especially if the individual relapses.

“Methadone and/or Buprenorphine (Suboxone) should not be taken long-term.”

Clinical studies have shown patients on short-term Opioid Replacement Therapy were more likely to relapse and return to opioid abuse. Compared to patients on medications for extended term (6 months or longer). For a successful recovery patients should be closely monitored by a qualified physician and should reduce medications gradually over time.

Medication Assisted Treatment has assisted many individuals to achieve long term abstinence and overall improved quality of like. It is however alone not a “miracle cure”. Combined with on-going evidence-based behavioral therapy, commitment, dedication, and determination, as well as a healthy sober support system individuals will achieve the best outcomes.

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AMATA

OFFICE HOURS

Mon-Fri: 10am - 6pm
(No Medication Dispensing between 2pm -3pm)
Sat: 10am - 1pm
Closed Sunday

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